#theEveryDay : “Get To” vs “Got To”

semantics2

Semantics

We speak thousands if not hundreds of thousands of words every day, but if you’re anything like me, most of the time I am not thinking of the power behind those words. Every once in a while I am reminded of how important it is to articulate a message through the proper use of language, but it’s also very easy to become distracted or even let loose a bit when in familiar environments with friends or family.

So, while operating a camera during an event titled ‘Board of Advisors” in Clearwater Beach, FL, a gentleman who I cannot name spoke briefly about semantics and the difference between living a life of “Peace” vs “Pressure”. To paraphrase his talk: “Instead of taking control of everything and putting yourself under pressure, just relinquish some of that control and be at Peace, because it will lead you to a happier lifestyle.” I’m going to highlight the one segment that stood out to me because, well you know…attention span.

The Difference between “Got To” vs “Get To”.

Say these out loud:

“I’ve got to go to work!”

“I get to go to work!”

Feel the difference? It’s as if the word “got” comes with chains in this circumstance, right? It’s an obligation. Something we truly do not want to do, but must. If everyone walked around claiming they’ve got to do things, you’ve got a nation of heavy shoulders and hanging heads just moping around doing things under pressure while stressed out. Get seems like we are about to receive a treat. “Guess what I get to do?” just sounds like freedom. It might even hold an ounce of privilege. “What’d you get?” is that doorway question that leads to  boasting about something awesome you’ve acquired. A nation of people who get to do things sounds like a nation full of happy, enthusiastic, and motivated individuals.  And it’s much more peaceful.

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Try using the word get in just about every circumstance that you would use the other, because realistically​, the only things we’ve got to do are die and pay taxes…and eat…. but we are provided the liberty of doing what we’d like to. We get to pick up our children, we get to go to meetings and make money, and we get to go to work. It’s semantics, and it makes a difference.

What other words do you use on a daily basis that can be swapped out for a word with less expectation and more…appreciation?

– Sean

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